More Amazing Student Bloggers

I’ve finished the evaluations of student blogs for the second five weeks of the semester. (Can you hear the angels singing?) The evaluation form I used held expectations for not only  blog content, but  use of Twitter, and Facebook pages created specifically for their professional blogs. It’s been a LOT of writing for the students, and therefore, a lot of reading for me.

This is my first experience teaching new media writing skills, and the use of social media tools as a platform for those skills. It has been an incredibly valuable educational experience for me, not only as an educator, but as a writer too. It’s also been an incredible amount of work. But just like I tell my student’s, “anything worth doing takes effort and time.”

As I read some my student’s work, I am impressed by their passion and talent. All of the students are “traditional college age”. This means they are the future. Some college Juniors and many Seniors on the edge of graduation, they are getting ready to launch into their careers and begin taking on the role(s) of leadership. What a privilege for me to be able to influence these future leaders and help them refine their talent. Add these student blogs to your reading list and you will understand exactly what I mean.

Jessica Drogemuller: Jess’s blog, “Fact or Pintion” expresses the heart of one of the latest social media tool superstars, Pinterest. Her casual, witty narrative style, personal photos, and use of Pinterest to promote her blog is making a mark on the blogosphere. She was nominated for an award by a fellow novice blogger; a first for our class. Congrats to Jesse.

Jerracah Heibel: Jerracah’s blog, “Paws for a Cause” reflects her passion for animals. It presents a wonderful introduction to the diverse issues related to animal cruelty, advocacy, and local (Cleveland, OH) concerns. Jerracah has partnered with a local shelter in hopes to help them with placement of dogs and cats needing forever homes.

Chris Perry: I’ve bragged about Chris and his blog, 216Artist before, but what can I say. Within two months, this kid has acquired 106 Twitter followers! He said in his reflective essay, “…I have seen great success in the first few weeks of my blogging experience, and look forward to the future of what my writing and social media can do for me as a young professional in the workforce.” You go Chris!

Olena Orlova: Olena’s blog, “Wine & Dine: Eating Your Way Across the Cultures” is an excellent mix of education, culture, and food. Don’t read it on an empty stomach. I learned so much about wine, crepes, and Ukrainian holidays while I perused (evaluated) her blog. It is truly inspiring and delicious. Our family dinners will never be the same.

Ryenn Lyons: Ryenn’s blog, “A Peaceful Panic” focuses on informing readers of news, concerns and  life experiences of those  suffering from anxiety. Although she is still working on connecting to Twitter and Facebook, start following her blog now. It’s artful design, well-researched content, and delicate treatment of a common health problem will make a large impact on readers.

 

Blog Check-In Report #2

Another five weeks have passed, and the anxiety level of my students mounts daily. I’m grading their Blogging Check-In Report #2- a chronicle of their second five weeks of blogging, tweeting, and posting on their professional Facebook pages.

Some students worked hard and are learning, growing, and developing their new media writing expertise. Others, stuck in college student apathy, have not. My reviews of their work are a tough, bitter pill for those still waiting to commit to the learning process. As with all learning experiences, this one comes with a struggle.

For those embracing the struggle, their work is beginning to blossom like a rewarding sign of beauty after a winter of sleep deprivation, research and revision. My students and I discovered the following truths from our class experience during the middle five weeks of the semester:

  • Blogging is hard work
  • Twitter is an amazing networking tool
  • Not as many readers (in their target audiences) interact on Facebook
  • Readers will follow and respond to quality content
  • Connecting to the outside world through social media takes time, but is incredibly rewarding
  • It takes practice to find your voice (niche) in the blogging community
  • Once you determine a way to manage this crazy world, it can be addictive, awesome, and empowering
  • Citizen journalism requires a great deal of critical thinking, reading, and consistent observation and awareness

Some blossoming blogging experts to honor this five weeks include:

Chuck Frate: His blog focuses on family recipes as identified by a local expert, his mother Pam. Chuck’s narrative thread of  family life, traditions, and other cultural aspects offers readers a unique voice that is just beginning to show up consistently in his posts. He is finding his niche in the plethora of food related blogs on the web. I’m looking forward to reading more.

Theodore Darden: This guy is serious! A soon to be graduate of Notre Dame College, Theodore has a passion for discussing issues related to the world’s supply of fresh water. Darden is developing a refreshing mix of information, passion and entertainment to keep readers scrolling and hoping for more.

Jacob Bunner: This blossoming sports journalist knows how to engage concerned parents. His blog examines youth sports issues including a variety of sports related injuries detailed by sport, the great concussion discussion, and breaking news related to youth sports. Although he needs to work on remembering to edit and pound out tighter leads, this blogger is definitely someone to follow if you love sports and kids.

I’m only half way through the grading and hopeful to find more incredibly talented citizen journalists. Stay tuned…..

#216artists?

All local artists! Check this out

the216artist

The216Artist is now accepting submissions for it’s #216artists series. This series will profile a new creative mind from Cleveland. Arts, music, fashion, drama, all apply, just send submissions to the216artist@gmail.com.

 

Or let us know in the comments below who you think should be our first #216artists.

Let the games begin!!

-c

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Poem in my Pocket Day

The other day I pointed my car at the interstate for another dismal, mad rush home. I hate commuting, dodging cars with distracted drivers, and the endless stops and starts. It was another dreary day in a string of gray, drizzly days, with lower than average temperatures. Northeast Ohio Winter is easily summed up with one word. Gray.

As my car gathered speed to join the pack, I sighed audibly, feeling the weight of oppressive, depressing weather and circumstances. Then my eye caught a flash of yellow peeking out of the brown grass beside the road berm. I merged into the line-up, but took the time to examine the little ray of sunshine that had caught my eye. Sure enough, there they were. A tiny little cluster of daffodils waving their heads with optimism to any fortunate passerby taking the time to notice. These little sprites of spring cheered me. Their image transformed my thoughts of drudgery to the words of William Wordsworth, I couldn’t help but recite.

In third grade, my teacher made the class memorize a poem! Such drudgery. Such uselessness. Or so we all thought. The words were strange and awkward to our young minds. “Who cares about daffodils”? We all asked one another. Our teacher not only had the audacity to make us memorize the words of a dead poet, but she also made us perform the poem for each other. We were convinced the adults in charge of our education had lost their minds. We were sure there would be no lasting benefit to memorizing a poem about flowers.

I cannot tell you how often in my adult life I have been ashamed of my 3rd grade attitude. I do understand where it probably originated. I believe we are a product of our culture more times than we would like to admit, and it is only through education that we overcome it. How often in American culture do we honor the poet? Why do we fail to realize the value of beautiful words, words that bring forth the rhythm of life and give birth to deep emotion and meaning? It is a shameful thing.

If it were not for Mr. Wordsworth’s gift of poetry, my heart and mind would not be transformed by a vision of tiny daffodils on a road embankment. My gray day would have remained lackluster and tiring. My thoughts upon an initial vision of yellow quickly passing my window, would not tap a memory engrained through the efforts of my 3rd grade teacher. I would not have perceived the hope, promise, and joy these beautiful words ignite:

I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced; but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
A poet could not but be gay,
In such a jocund company:
I gazed—and gazed—but little thought
What wealth the show to me had brought:

For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood,
They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

William Wordsworth

Today as we rushed out the door, my daughter announced, “It’s “poem in your pocket day”.

“It is?!” I responded. “How lovely. How absolutely lovely”.

Thank you Mr. Wordsworth for the poem that will always remain in my “pocket”. It enriches my adult life more than I could ever imagine .